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On 7 April, the 70th anniversary of the Katyń massacre, the prime ministers of Poland and Russia, Donald Tusk and Vladimir Putin, are to attend a joint commemoration at the site where an estimated 20,000 Polish prisoners of war captured by the Red Army in 1939 were murdered by Soviet secret police (NKVD). “Is this a turning point?” asks Gazeta Wyborcza, referring to a thaw in relations between Warsaw and Moscow, which still continues to withhold all NKVD files on the event. This comes one week after Russian public televison aired Andrzej Wajda’s film on Katyń for the first time, and the Russian Federal Archives announced the discovery of new documents pertaining to the massacre which the Polish press hopes Vladimir Putin will forward to his Polish counterpart. “The Russians know a great deal about Katyń, but have remained silent. But even in Russia the shame of the disgraceful past cannot overcome the truth,” reads today’s leader in Polska.