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"Brussels is in favour of a 30% reduction in CO2 emmissions," reports Le Monde, which has obtained a Commission paper on the topic to be published on 26 May. As the daily explains, Brussels is no longer satisfied with the 20% reduction by 2020 approved by Europe's 27 member states in 2007, which it believes will not be sufficient if the EU is to meet the long-term goal of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2050. As for the agreement reached by the 2009 Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, in a best case scenario, this will only result in a 15% cut in emissions. "If member states fall into step behind the Commission on this issue, they will give a major boost to international climate change negotiations," notes Le Monde. The added annual cost of reducing emissions by 30% has been estimated at 11 billion euros, however the measure should "encourage Europe to reinforce its economic position and to create jobs in the environmental sectors that are deemed to be the most lucrative: energy efficiency and renewable energies," explains the daily. At the same time, the Commission believes that the risk of industrial delocalisation to countries with less stringent environmental regulations remains limited, although Le Monde also notes that there is as yet no international agreement on this topic.